Tuesday, May 24, 2016

Acts of War: Aztlan Mythology, Open Borders, and the Lies of Social Justice

Staff Writer, DL Mullan
Mexican Mythology / History 
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Ever heard of the propaganda of Open Borders? How about people should be free to immigrate wherever they want to?  How about the myth of Aztlan? 

In today's political climate, Americans are bombarded with several viewpoints about immigration and how our immigration laws are unfair. How Americans need to change for the "open borders" movement. With Mexicans protesting in American streets and waving Mexican flags against the American People, Americans are confused to the injury claimed was inflicted upon poor Hispanics. 

What if that sympathy for an unfair injury is misplaced? What if a century's old mythology of land lost is the real culprit of Hispanic disrespect and indignation for American sovereignty? 

Let's delve into the history of the United States and Mexico as well we bring before the court of public opinion two treaties and one war. 

The Mexican-American War   
Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo (1848)
Gadsden Purchase Treaty   

These three historical entities comprise the reality of new nations seeking to define themselves and their boundaries. 

America back in the early part of the 19th Century had offered Mexico money for all the lands north of the Rio Grande River including California and New Mexico. The new state of Texas was also under the control of the United States after Texas has won its independence from the former. 

Mexico and the United States' relationship was strained with border identity issues as well as citizen claims against Mexico. The United States sought resolution through diplomatic changes, which failed.
Mexico, claiming that the boundary was the Nueces Riverto the northeast of the Rio Grande, considered the advance of Taylor’s army an act of aggression and in April 1846 sent troops across the Rio Grande. Polk, in turn, declared the Mexican advance to be an invasion of U.S. soil, and on May 11, 1846, asked Congress to declare war on Mexico, which it did two days later. 
Thus began the Mexican-American War.
Following the defeat of the Mexican army and the fall of Mexico City, in September 1847, the Mexican government surrendered and peace negotiations began. The war officially ended with the February 2, 1848, signing in Mexico of the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo. The treaty added an additional 525,000 square miles to United States territory, including the land that makes up all or parts of present-day Arizona, California, Colorado, Nevada, New Mexico, Utah and Wyoming. Mexico also gave up all claims to Texas and recognized the Rio Grande as America’s southern boundary. In return, the United States paid Mexico $15 million and agreed to settle all claims of U.S. citizens against Mexico.
Yet the myth of Aztlan persists. Mexico lost the war with America and lands north of the Rio Grande River. If America had been unjust in the capture of these assets then why pay $12 million plus 6% per annum in interest, culminating in the sum of $15 million? 

The lands of California, New Mexico, Arizona, Utah, Nevada, Colorado, Wyoming, Oregon, and Washington State were all paid for by the United States' government. Over 160 years have passed and yet the border problems continue for Americans.

Even back in history, the United States and Mexico again entered into another treaty to clarify their national boundaries: The Gadsden Purchase of 1853.
In consideration of the foregoing stipulations, the Government of the United States agrees to pay to the government of Mexico, in the city of New York, the sum of ten millions of dollars, of which seven millions shall be paid immediately upon the exchange of the ratifications of this treaty, and the remaining three millions as soon as the boundary line shall be surveyed, marked, and established.
Again, the United States has offered the nation of Mexico money for any lands that may be ceded by the foreign country to produce a mutual border. 
The several provisions, stipulations, and restrictions contained in the 7th article of the treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo shall remain in force only so far as regards the Rio Bravo del Forte, below the initial of the said boundary provided in the first article of this treaty; that is to say, below the intersection of the 31° 47'30'/ parallel of latitude, with the boundary line established by the late treaty dividing said river from its mouth upwards, according to the fifth article of the treaty of Guadalupe.
The treaty was ratified by both parties. Still the myth that the United States stole land from Mexico prevails in the urban legends of Mexican-Americans and illegal Mexican immigrants alike. 

Two organizations that influence Hispanics in the states are: La Raza and MEChA. Both push this false narrative of being victims of white supremacists activities instead of researching history and the treaties for themselves.

The ideologies of this open lie within the Hispanic community is described as:
The most visible of these groups are MEChA, The Brown Berets de Aztlan, OLA (Organization for the Liberation of Aztlan), La Raza Unida Party, and the "Nation of Aztlan" to name a few. Although the activism of these organizations vary from somewhat radical to extremely radical, they share the same objectives, the "liberation of Aztlan." Each follows the Raza manifesto "El Plan de Aztlan (sometimes called "El Plan Espiritual de Aztlan"). The Nation of Aztlan, tied to La Voz de Aztlan disseminates the exact same propaganda that MEChA spreads including antisemitic propaganda. Believers in the Aztlan legend insist upon the indivisibility of "La Raza" and their common goals, one of them being the need to abolish the border between the U.S. and Mexico. There is a myriad of Raza college newspaper. 
MEChA's own website even states their intentions of direct hostilities against the United State government, which is treason and an act of war, and the American People. The first paragraph of the site reads:
We, Movimiento Estudiantil Chican@ de Aztlan (M.E.Ch.A), stand with the Ayotzinapa 43, their families, and their community. As the largest and oldest organization of Chican@ youth within the occupied indigenous land known as the United States of America, we refuse to follow suit of said government by remaining silent about the realities terrorizing our gente in Mexico
This derision has not been felt more in recent years but in the current American election cycle. Even rioters were keeping Americans from exercising their freedoms and rights while waving Mexican flags: Over 20 People Arrested When Protest Becomes Violent at Trump Rally. This "movement" is no more about freedom then their supposed angst against the "realities terrorizing our gente in Mexico." It's about terrorizing Americans too. 

These Hispanic protesters even yell: "Go back to Europe," which highlights the ignorance of this movement and the brainwashing contained within its group think since their Spanish blood comes from, you guessed it: Europe. Here's the footage: Mexican Flag Waving Protesters Disrupt Peaceful Trump Rally.

When will Americans be freed from the lies of Hispanics' imaginary "occupied indigenous land" that we not only won in war, but also we paid for to the country of Mexico?

Social justice demands reparations for past injuries that have never taken place. Ignorance or racism on the part of Hispanics fuels the flames of this radical religious belief of a mythical land stolen from Hispanics by the white establishment government of the United States.

Social justice has adopted this "injustice" instead of reading and understanding history itself. Even the Treaty of Guadalupe-Hidalgo has many fine points Mexican-Amerians should apprise themselves on:
Those who shall prefer to remain in the said territories may either retain the title and rights of Mexican citizens, or acquire those of citizens of the United States. But they shall be under the obligation to make their election within one year from the date of the exchange of ratifications of this treaty; and those who shall remain in the said territories after the expiration of that year, without having declared their intention to retain the character of Mexicans, shall be considered to have elected to become citizens of the United States.
Even over 160 years ago, the United States did not want foreign immigrants residing in the country loyal to a foreign government.
The Mexicans who, in the territories aforesaid, shall not preserve the character of citizens of the Mexican Republic, conformably with what is stipulated in the preceding article, shall be incorporated into the Union of the United States. and be admitted at the proper time (to be judged of by the Congress of the United States) to the enjoyment of all the rights of citizens of the United States, according to the principles of the Constitution; and in the mean time, shall be maintained and protected in the free enjoyment of their liberty and property, and secured in the free exercise of their religion without restriction.
Immigration was seamless and lawful under this treaty. Same as today, Mexicans still do not have the right to emigrate where and as they please without the express permission of a neighboring foreign nation. Let's repeat the treaty's line: "and be admitted at the proper time (to be judged of by the Congress of the United States)."

The United States dictates its border policies, not social justice movements or victimization mythologies.  This interpretation of citizenship under this treaty is still enforce today, yet Mexicans and Mexican-Americans view their immigration status as a fluid "human right" fallacy that disrespects other people and other nations. 

All this information and Mexico's cessation of lands was reaffirmed in the Gadsden Purchase Treaty. A treaty Santa Ana signed because he ran his country into the ground and needed the money. That is fact.

If you would like more history factoids, please see our links and sources.

The United State's immigration laws and policies are not at fault in this matter only the "interpretation" of a bygone mythology that seeks to undermine treaties and relations between two neighboring countries.

The onslaught of Hispanic and Latin American influx defies the treaties already set with Mexico. A border fence would help stem the tide of illegal immigration into the United States. Yet a former Mexican President predicts any activities to protect American citizens from human and sex trafficking, violent gangs, and the illicit drug trade as well as illegal immigration is in Vicente Fox's summation: "would lead to a war with Mexico."

Election politics aside, the former Mexican President stated: “He is ugly America,” Fox continued, arguing Trump’s policies could lead to war. “He is the hated gringo because he’s attacking all of us. He’s offending all of us.”

Isn't invading a neighboring nation with over 30 million illegal immigrants over the decades an attack on a neighboring nation?  Isn't this aggressive behavior an act of war in and upon itself, Mr. Fox? During your time as the President of Mexico you oversaw this invasion first hand, wouldn't that suggest that you have already personally declared war on the United States?

Since the middle part of the 19th Century Mexico has fostered a mythology and now a social justice cause that promotes the disrespect of national boundaries, it encourages the illegal immigration of not only its own people but peoples from Latin America. Shouldn't these acts against American interests and sovereignty be considered acts of war since these acts void the intent of the aforementioned treaties to establish boundaries and enumerate conditions of respect as well as define American citizenship to be the right of our Congress to stipulate?

Mr. Fox should tread on this subject with more respect to Americans who are tired of unskilled, uneducated, and uninformed individuals transgressing our sovereign territory like no national boundaries exist for the implementation of an aggressive action against the United States government and its People to fulfill a defunct and illegitimate ideology comprising the hate-filled mythological Aztlan. 

What's more offensive? Being called thieves and liars? Being overrun by illegal immigrants who believe a racist mythology? Or, being told that our national sovereignty is an act of war?


Sources: History Channel, Mayomo, Buzzfeed, Movimiento Estudiantil Chican@ de Aztlan (MEChA),

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